What I do instead of working

thedsgnblog:

Jonathan Shackleton    |    http://jshackleton.co.uk

"Personal identity and self promotion consisting of a simple, structured logo and various design assets. The logo was constructed using initials, focusing primarily on the letter S combined with first initial, J. To contrast the minimal design and application of the logo, bold gradient of color is used throughout all the design elements."

Jonathan is a freelance designer and illustrator. He loves all aspects of design with a particular passion for illustration, editorial design, typography, branding, web design, photography etc. Conceptual thinking is his key to producing a strong piece of work, developing clever ideas to ensure the outcome is unique and fresh. Jonathan is passionate about design and he strives to create visually interesting and highly considered outcomes.

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thedsgnblog:

Quote(s) of the week - 28/04/2014

Dangerdust    |    http://behance.net/ddccad

They are dangerdust and they love chalk. Despite their overwhelming workload at Columbus College of Art & Design they bring it upon themselves to create a chalkboard every week. They have taken over the chalkboard on the third floor of Crane and every Monday a new board appears.

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explore-blog:

A technical glitch causes the Hubble Space Telescope, which ordinarily captures magnificently crisp scientific imagery of the cosmos, to lose balance and create this inadvertent piece of modern art.

It is suspected that in this case, Hubble had locked onto a bad guide star, potentially a double star or binary. This caused an error in the tracking system, resulting in this remarkable picture of brightly colored stellar streaks. The prominent red streaks are from stars in the globular cluster NGC 288. 

explore-blog:

A technical glitch causes the Hubble Space Telescope, which ordinarily captures magnificently crisp scientific imagery of the cosmos, to lose balance and create this inadvertent piece of modern art.

It is suspected that in this case, Hubble had locked onto a bad guide star, potentially a double star or binary. This caused an error in the tracking system, resulting in this remarkable picture of brightly colored stellar streaks. The prominent red streaks are from stars in the globular cluster NGC 288.